16% of cats administered fresh frozen plasma (FFP) experienced a possible adverse transfusion reaction (ATR) which was mild and had no significant impact on survival. The most common ATR was increased body temperature, followed by dyspnoea/tachypnoea
Journal citation

Lane, W.G., Sinnott-Stutzman, V.B. (2020)
Retrospective evaluation of fresh frozen plasma use in 121 cats: 2009-201
Journal of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care; 30 (5) 558-566
Abstract

Published September/October 2020

Type of study
  • Retrospective study
  • n = 121 cats
Key points
  • The main objectives of this study were to report the most common indications, doses used and rate of adverse transfusion reactions (ATR) in cats administered fresh frozen plasma (FFP)
  • Prophylactic use is controversial as a clear benefit has not been demonstrated, and FFP represents a high-cost resource with the potential risk to cause harm
  • Coagulopathy was the most common indication for FFP administration in cats
  • Median dose administered was 6 ml/kg
  • Cats were significantly less likely to be coagulopathic post-transfusion
  • A possible ATR occurred in 16% of cats and was mild with no significant impact on survival
  • Increased body temperature was the most common ATR (10%) followed by dyspnoea/tachypnoea (7%)
  • Despite the use of FFP for prophylactic use being controversial, only a third of cats with suspected coagulopathy had evidence of haemorrhage at the time of transfusion

Limitations

  • Retrospective nature of the study meant records were often incomplete
  • Lack of a control group meant that outcomes for cats with similar disease processes could not be compared, so any suggestion of clinical benefit from the doses in this study must be interpreted cautiously
Conclusions
  • ATR’s in cats administered FFP are infrequent and mild with no significant impact on survival
  • Increased body temperature was the most common ATR followed by dyspnoea/tachypnoea